ARTnews in Brief: Kasmin Now Represents George Rickey—and More from November 2, 2020

Monday, November 2 Kasmin Now Represents George Rickey Kasmin gallery in New York now represents American sculptor George Rickey, who died at the age of 95 in 2002. Rickey is best known for his monumental abstract sculptures—“useless machines,” as he called them—whose movements were guided by changes in air currents. The gallery will present two simultaneous exhibitions of … Continue reading “ARTnews in Brief: Kasmin Now Represents George Rickey—and More from November 2, 2020”

Monday, November 2

Kasmin Now Represents George Rickey
Kasmin gallery in New York now represents American sculptor George Rickey, who died at the age of 95 in 2002. Rickey is best known for his monumental abstract sculptures—“useless machines,” as he called them—whose movements were guided by changes in air currents. The gallery will present two simultaneous exhibitions of work by the artist in fall 2021, starting with the installation of nine large-scale sculptures along Park Avenue, as part of a public art program organized by the Sculpture Committee of the Fund for Park Avenue in collaboration with NYC Parks. Also on display will be three works on view from Manhattan’s High Line. Eric Gleason, senior director at Kasmin, said in a statement, “George Rickey is a singular entity in the history of 20th-century sculpture, and his numerous innovations within the realm of kinetics helped to create and define a genre.”

NSU Art Museum Fort Lauderdale Receives $1.6 M. Gift
The Nova Southeastern University Art Museum Fort Lauderdale in Florida has received a $1.6 million donation from the Jerry Taylor & Nancy Bryant Foundation to endow a curatorial position and fund youth education programs at the institution. The museum has launched a nationwide search to fill its new curatorial role.

Nazi-Looted Pissarro Painting Remains Subject of Ongoing Dispute
According to a report by the New York Times, a Holocaust survivor who owns a Camille Pissarro painting that was looted from her father by Nazis has filed a lawsuit seeking permanent ownership without exhibition rotation. A previous agreement between Léone Meyer, the painting’s owner, and the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art at the University of Oklahoma, where the work had been held before Meyer knew it had belonged to her father, had established a rotational relationship between the American museum and one or multiple French art institutions.

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