ARTnews in Brief: 2021 Edition of FOG Design+Art Fair Postponed—and More from September 21, 2020

Monday, September 21

2021 Edition of FOG Design+Art Fair Postponed
The eighth edition of the FOG Design+Art Fair in San Francisco has been delayed from January 2021 until the following year, with its new dates being January 20–23, 2022 and a preview gala set for January 19. In a statement, a spokesperson for the fair said, “After carefully assessing developments of the pandemic and its implications on large-scale gatherings, we do not feel it will be possible to execute an event that fully embraces the spirit of FOG as soon as January 2021.”

Hartwig Art Foundation to Donate Work to Dutch National Collection
Through a new fund, the Hartwig Art Foundation, a Dutch organization based in the Hague that facilitates the creation of artworks, will donate art to national art collection of the Netherlands. The fund will allow for an annual series of new artworks that, once realized, will … Read the rest

Monday, September 21

2021 Edition of FOG Design+Art Fair Postponed
The eighth edition of the FOG Design+Art Fair in San Francisco has been delayed from January 2021 until the following year, with its new dates being January 20–23, 2022 and a preview gala set for January 19. In a statement, a spokesperson for the fair said, “After carefully assessing developments of the pandemic and its implications on large-scale gatherings, we do not feel it will be possible to execute an event that fully embraces the spirit of FOG as soon as January 2021.”

Hartwig Art Foundation to Donate Work to Dutch National Collection
Through a new fund, the Hartwig Art Foundation, a Dutch organization based in the Hague that facilitates the creation of artworks, will donate art to national art collection of the Netherlands. The fund will allow for an annual series of new artworks that, once realized, will … Read the rest

Smithsonian American Art Museum Acquires Its First Sound Installation

One year after she appeared in the Whitney Biennial, two pieces by artist Christine Sun Kim are joining the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C., marking the institution’s first acquisition of a sound installation. The news was announced Wednesday in an Instagram post by Los Angeles’s François Ghebaly gallery, which represents Kim. The acquired works by Kim, One Week of Lullabies for Roux (2018) and Close Readings (2015), will debut in an exhibition on art and musical thinking planned for 2022.

“Together, these pieces offer a wonderful introduction to Kim’s complex, multimedia practice and her incisive exploration of the social life of sound,” Saisha Grayson, curator of time-based media at SAAM, told ARTnews. “Kim’s pointed, playful, personal interventions encourage us all to bring renewed attention and care to our individual and collective relationships to sound, and how we communicate and connect with each other.”… Read the rest

Bees Encase Raw-Material Embroideries with Honeycomb in New Encaustic Works by Ava Roth

“Falling Horsehair, Gold #2,” encaustic, Japanese tissue, horse hair and thread in embroidery hoop, embedded in honeycomb, custom double length Langstroth hive frame, 19”x 9.5 inches. All images © Ava Roth, shared with permission

When Ava Roth adds the last stitch grasping horsehair or porcupine quills to her embroidered artworks, she passes the fibrous material on to her black-and-yellow counterparts. The Toronto-based artist collaborates with bees to encase her mixed-media pieces in waxy honeycomb. What emerges are organic artworks that consider interspecies interactions and the beauty that such meetings can garner.

Since 2019, Roth has been expanding the wooden frames of her works to twice the size as previous projects. She receives help from master beekeeper Mylee Nordin, and together, they vertically stack hive boxes, which are known as supers, and insert large, custom-made structures. The artist also has developed a more detailed practice in recent months. “Because this … Read the rest

São Paulo’s Cutting-Edge Galeria Jaqueline Martins Expands to Brussels

As economic uncertainty continues to make the future of many art galleries unclear, one Brazilian enterprise has decided to move forward with plans to open an outpost in Europe. Galeria Jaqueline Martins, which has over the last nine years established itself as one of São Paulo’s most cutting-edge galleries by helping to revive the careers of many overlooked and underknown Brazilian artists, will open a new space in Brussels next month.

The new location, which measures around 750 square-feet, will open on October 17 with a solo show by the late artist Hudinilson Jr. The space is located in Brussels’s Sablon neighborhood, which is also home to the likes of Jan Mot, Gladstone Gallery, and fellow Brazilian gallery Mendes Wood DM as well as the Musée Magritte. Yuri Oliveira, who joined the gallery last year and had previously worked at São Paulo’s Galeria Luciana Brito, will become a … Read the rest

Rich Portraits Illustrated by Uli Knörzer Capture Subjects’ Idiosyncrasies through Colored Pencil

All images © Uli Knörzer, shared with permission

Fascinated by the transient expressions and feelings of his subjects, Uli Knörzer attempts to capture a moment in time. The Berlin-based illustrator draws richly detailed portraits that are simultaneously revealing and elusive. By positioning each subject against a solid backdrop, Knörzer eliminates the contexts that inspire their particular looks and moods. “Because a tilt of the head and look to the side or a smirk could be just that but by putting it on paper, detached from their surroundings, that fleeting moment can be charged with a completely different meaning. All of a sudden someone very outspoken and extroverted can appear very introspective, etc,” he shares with Colossal.

Always focused on idiosyncracies, Knörzer says his choice in subjects is particular. “It’s always the side scene, someone in the background, or a backstage moment that draws my attention, and I imagine what their … Read the rest

Bay Area Galleries Band Together to Launch Communal Online Platform

In the spring, in response to pandemic-related restrictions and closures of public spaces, a group of Los Angeles galleries banded together to form Gallery Platform L.A., an online home for virtual viewing rooms and curated projects presented by local art enterprises on a weekly basis. Now, a set of Bay Area galleries is joining forces as part of a similar effort called 8-bridges, a virtual platform launching on October 1 and named for the eight bridges that connect the San Francisco Bay.

Founded by a committee including Altman Siegel, Fraenkel Gallery, Friends Indeed, Gagosian, Jessica Silverman, Pace Palo Alto, Ratio 3, and art-market operatives Sophia Kinell and Sarah Wendell Sherrill, 8-bridges will offer monthly rotating exhibitions by Bay Area galleries. For the month of October, founding committee members and guest gallery Rebecca Camacho Presents will have presentations on the platform. The platform will also spotlight San Francisco’s Museum of … Read the rest

Meditative Faces Emerge from the Staggered Wooden Sticks Forming Artist Gil Bruvel’s Sculptures

“Breathe” (2020). All images © Gil Bruvel, shared with permission

Gil Bruvel (previously) has spent 40 years practicing vipassanā meditation, an introspective practice that invites judgment-free observation of the mind. The Australia-born artist infuses the philosophies of this decades-long ritual into his variegated sculptures as he forms a series of faces in deep thought. With eyes and mouths closed, the figures project serenity and calmness, serving as “a reminder of what it looks like to be centered and at peace,” Bruvel says of The Mask Series.

Different in shape and size, the sticks are burned, painted with subtle gradients, and then held in place with wood glue, causing the figures to appear pixelated and as a disparate grouping of squares and rectangles when viewed up close. From a distance, however, “that fragmentation reveals a coherent whole: a face arises from apparent chaos,” Bruvel shares with Colossal. … Read the rest

Ailing Museums Receive $24 Million in Emergency Grants from Mellon Foundation

Experts are forecasting a bleak future for U.S. museums struggling to make it through a pandemic. In July, the American Alliance of Museums released the findings of a survey that predicted the closure of 12,000 U.S. museums as a result of the coronavirus—a blow that the AAMD said “will be devastating for communities, economies, education systems, and our cultural history.” Now, in an attempt to mitigate the damage, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in New York has released nearly $24 million in grants to ailing museums.

As announced on Thursday, a new program called the Art Museum Futures Fund is intended to support midsize art museums in a time of crisis. The first round of grants will go to 12 museums across the U.S., with each receiving grants of different scales (the highest being $5.5 million). The next round will offer $3 million grants to small museums.

In a statement, … Read the rest

Mesmerizing Shots of Distant Galaxies and Aurorae Top the Astronomy Photographer of the Year Contest

“Andromeda Galaxy at Arm’s Length?” © Nicolas Lefaudeux (France), galaxies winner and overall winner. “Have you ever dreamt of touching a galaxy? This version of the Andromeda Galaxy seems to be at arm’s length among clouds of stars. Unfortunately, this is just an illusion, as the galaxy is still 2 million light-years away. In order to obtain the tilt-shift effect, the photographer 3D-printed a part to hold the camera at an angle at the focus of the telescope. The blur created by the defocus at the edges of the sensor gives this illusion of closeness to Andromeda.”

The 2020 Insight Investment Astronomy Photographer of the Year contest gathers a trove of sublime shots capturing otherwise unseen phenomena and distant fixtures of outer space. With more than 5,000 entries from six continents, the 12th annual competition includes Nicolas Lefaudeux’s photograph of the Andromeda Galaxy two million light-years away, one by … Read the rest

In a New Book, Scholar Arlene Dávila Writes About the Invisibility of Latinx Art in the Market

The art market is one of the attention-getting elements of the art world, but a new book focuses on a part of the market that is often invisible. Latinx Art: Artists/Markets/Politics by Arlene Dávila—an anthropology professor at New York University and the founder of the school’s Latinx Project—considers why Latinx art continues to be undervalued and how racism figures in the market around it. In her book, published by Duke University Press, Dávila writes about what is meant by the term “Latinx art,” how it is distinct from Latin American art (and why the coupling of the two can be problematic), and how the exhibiting of art in general feeds into the creation a market—or a lack of one. As she writes, “The invisibility of Latinx artists is everyone’s concern.” ARTnews spoke with Dávila to learn more about the book.

ARTnews: When did you start thinking that Latinx Read the rest