Phillips will sell its first NFT by digital artist Mad Dog Jones (Micah Dowbak) in an online sale that will run from April 12–23, with bidding starting at $100.

The fully digital piece, titled REPLICATOR, is an “NFT experience,” according to Phillips statement on the piece, which is designed to self-produce 7 unique NFT “generations” in a 28-day cycle. The original NFT set to be auctioned is an image of an urban night scene. At its center is a photocopy machine; its screen reads “Ready to replicate.” From that illustration, the work will produce one new NFT per month, with every subsequent cycle producing one less artwork.

“It uniquely links form, subject, and function as it is completely dependent on the capabilities of an NFT to exist and perform the role it’s been given,” said Rebekah Bowling, a senior specialist in Phillips’s 20th century and contemporary art department.

According … Read the rest

Leonardo da Vinci’s “Portrait of Lisa Gherardini” known as La Joconde or Monna Lisa, the 1st quarter of the 16th century (1503-1518)

The Louvre just launched a new online database compiling more than 480,000 artworks from its collections and those at the Musée National Eugène-Delacroix and The Tuileries Garden. Spanning Egyptian antiquities and medieval sculpture to Renaissance and modern decorative arts, the free digital catalog includes works on long-term loan and is complete with an interactive map to pursue each room of the French institution. Some pieces are grouped into albums, including one collating 2020’s acquisitions and another dedicated to the National Museums Recovery, a collection of works gathered after World War II that’s being held by the Louvre until they’re claimed by their rightful beneficiaries. Dive into the entire archive, which is updated daily, on the museum’s site.

 

Brick panel from Achaemenid: Darius I (circa 510 BC) (-522

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Legend has it that, in 1969, while walking down Chicago’s East Ontario street, Stefan T. Edlis, who died in 2019, was awestruck by a building that appeared to be under construction and covered in black tarp. He thought at first that this was simply an intriguing construction site. In fact, it was a conceptual artwork by Christo who, with his partner Jeanne-Claude, sheathed various structures in fabric. Beneath it was the new site of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, opened two years earlier. That initial curiosity would lead Edlis to be a lifelong supporter of the MCA Chicago and other hometown arts institutions.

“Having known him half my life, I have this feeling that, when he was ‘duped’ by Christo, he was the opposite of bemused—he was delighted,” the MCA’s current director, Madeline Grynsztejn, recently told ARTnews.

And such a genuine affection for challenging conceptual art would come … Read the rest

“Persian Kangaroo.” All images © Debbie Lawson, shared with permission

A new menagerie of polar bears, stags, and kangaroos resemble typical wildlife except for the fact that they’re literally swept under the carpet, their features hidden from view. These towering sculptural forms are by artist Debbie Lawson (previously), who crafts animals that are cloaked in sweeping Persian rugs. Rather than being camouflaged by a forest, jungle, or snow-covered Arctic, Lawson’s creatures boldly protrude from the fabric and loom over the viewer.

In her process, Lawson sculpts the animals from a combination of chicken wire and masking tape. She then layers luscious carpets across them, creating the illusion that these animals are about to jump, walk, and prance out of the fabric. This method is derived from what Lawson describes as her ability to spot hidden images in floors, textured walls, and various patterns, an interest that’s mirrored in her perspective-altering … Read the rest

Another taught at the local college. View the complete fresco here. This is because countries with globalization some countries have been able to integrate and are growing faster and reducing poverty.

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In 2005, the Today Program of Radio 4 and National Gallery summer scheme were in the search of Britain’s greatest painting. This number is an all time audio-visual delight for its entertainment value. From the point of view of a critic, it is a creative masterpiece, the kind of which do not easilt get created in spite of all the best efforts. This unique number mixes uninhibited carelessness with romance, dance and music to produce an extraordinary amalgam of musical comedy. Composed by R D Burman, and directed by J Om Prakash, this song is about newly weds who go to a temple and get intoxicated with Bhang (fresh Cannabis leaves), a traditional intoxication … Read the rest

Watercolor paints come in two forms: in tubes of liquid paint and in pans of dried paint that must be hydrated. Which type to use is a matter of preference, but there are a couple of instances where pans are clearly the better choice. If you like to paint en plein air—a practice ushered in by Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Alfred Sisley, and Frédéric Bazille—you’ll likely find that watercolor pans, many of which come in compact carrying cases that can double as palettes, are the most convenient option. They are also a good choice if you paint only occasionally, as you don’t have to worry about your materials drying out. Whatever your reasoning, choosing the right professional paint will make all the difference in your work. For our top recommendations of highly pigmented, rich, flowing pan watercolor paints, browse the list below. 

ARTNEWS RECOMMENDS
Daniel Smith Watercolor Half Pans and
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Detail of “Liquid Sunshine/I am a Pluviophile” (2019), glass, phosphorescent material, broad-spectrum UV lights, motion detector, 3,353 x 4,267 x 3,658 millimeters as installation. Photo by Yasushi Ichikawa, 33rd Rakow Commission, courtesy of The Corning Museum of Glass. All images © Rui Sasaki, shared with permission

Approach the delicate glass artworks by Rui Sasaki, and witness the unpredictable patterns of the weather through a sublte glow of blue light. The Japanese artist’s experiential body of work translates varying forecasts into speckled sculptures that radiate once encountered, an intimate process that Sasaki describes as a way to “visualize subtle sunshine, record today’s weather, and transfer it from here to there/from there to here.”

At their brightest, the phosphorescent crystals are tinged green before fading to blue. “Visitors will doubtless be surprised to find that even if they cannot see anything on first entering the gallery, stay long enough and their eyes … Read the rest

Monday, March 29

Roberts Projects Adds Dominic Chambers
Roberts Projects in Los Angeles now represents Dominic Chambers. In his practice, Chambers explores the lived Black experience through figurative paintings which depict fleeting moments of leisure, contemplation, and camaraderie. Chambers has exhibited at institutions including Luce Gallery in Turin, the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, and the August Wilson African American Cultural Center in Pittsburgh. He will present a solo exhibition at the gallery in 2022.

Rainin Fellowship Names Inaugural Recipients
The Oakland-based Kenneth Rainin Foundation has announced the inaugural recipients of the Rainin Fellowship, which is administered by United States Artists and supports artists in the Bay Area. The four fellows for 2021, who each get an unrestricted $100,000 grant, are choreographer and performance maker Amara Tabor-Smith; actor, director, playwright, and educator Margo Hall; the People’s Kitchen Collective, an artistic and activist project focusing … Read the rest

Installation view of “Sakura Shibefuru” (2021), salt, at Setouchi City Art Museum. All images © Motoi Yamamoto, shared with permission

Sprawling across a bright red floor at Setouchi City Art Museum is Motoi Yamamoto’s sweeping installation of 100,000 cherry blossoms. Using a small, petal stencil and poured salt, the Kanazawa-based artist meticulously laid a mass of mineral-based buds during the course of 55 hours and nine days. Constructed radially, “Sakura Shibefuru,” or “Falling Cherry Petals” mimics the natural patterns formed around trees after the blossoms drop and end their life cycle each spring, a process Yamamoto (previously) says informed much of the work:

When the red-purple buds fall, for many people, this is also the time when they lose interest due to the flower season being over. However, this time can also be seen as a small nudge to think about the coming fresh greens of spring and midsummer…While thinking

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As galleries and collectors alike continue to adjust to buying and selling art online more than a year into the pandemic, Art Basel launched the first of its 2021 Online Viewing Rooms, which opened to VIPs on March 24 and runs until March 27.

In the past year, Art Basel has expanded its OVRs beyond just replacing its three staple fairs—in Hong Kong, Basel, and Miami Beach—with adding thematic editions focused on specific art-historical periods. Previous editions were devoted to 20th-century art and art made only during 2020. This iteration takes the title of “Pioneers,” and features 100 galleries from around the world, all of which are able to show only eight works at any given time. (As in past editions, galleries are able to swap out works as the fair progresses.)

The art on view in “OVR: Pioneers” centers around artists who have “broken new aesthetic, conceptual, or socio-political … Read the rest