For the first time in its 150-year history, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York has hired a full-time Native American art curator. Staring on September 14, Patricia Marroquin Norby (Purépecha) will be the Met’s inaugural associate curator of Native American art. She will work in the museum’s famed American Wing and report to Sylvia Yount, who oversees the presentations put on in that department of the Met.

Norby has previously served as senior executive and assistant director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian-New York. She has also been the director of the D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies at the Newberry, a research library in Chicago, and written scholarship on self-representation in Indigenous art.

“Historical and contemporary Native American art embodies and confronts the environmental, religious, and economic disruptions that Indigenous communities have so powerfully negotiated—and still negotiate—through a balance of beauty, … Read the rest

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News

The Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse New York will deaccession Jackson Pollock’s 1946 painting Red Composition, which is valued between $12 million and $18 million, as part of an effort to diversify its collection. [Art Market Monitor]

Following a pause due to the pandemic, a New York residency for Russian artists is planning for its fall cycle. The initiative was organized in a collaboration between the Moscow-based art collective AES+F and the International Studio & Curatorial Program. [The Art Newspaper]

The contemporary art scene in Athens is flourishing, according to a new report by the Financial Times. [Financial Times]

Collectors

Vanity Fair has a piece on the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee’s 2018 deposition of Leon Black, who has appeared on ARTnews‘s … Read the rest

In 1957, art critic Irving Sandler paid a visit to the studio of painter Joan Mitchell, an Abstract Expressionist known for her brushy images capturing nature. The result of that visit, printed in the October 1957 issue of ARTnews, became one of the most famous essays in this magazine’s “Paints a Picture” series, in which an artist illuminates the process behind one of his or her artworks. With an upcoming traveling retrospective of Mitchell’s work at the Baltimore Museum of Art in mind, ARTnews enlisted Mary Weatherford, an artist who has spoken of being inspired by Mitchell, to discuss Sandler’s article. “He’s a beautiful writer, so clear, so easy to read,” Weatherford said of Sandler’s writing. “I want to be the equivalent when I’m talking about this.”

Irving Sandler on Joan Mitchell: She finds particularly distasteful moral insinuations concerning “good” versus “bad” criteria, and insists that Read the rest

“Green Cosmarium Segmentation” (2018), hot sculpted, cut, color laminated, carved, glass, 7 1/4 × 10 × 7 1/4 inches. All images © Jiyong Lee, shared with permission

Fascinated by the organisms found in the sea and bodies of freshwater, artist Jiyong Lee (previously) sculpts semi-transparent artworks that evoke the various forms of algae and other microscopic creatures. The segmented pieces, which are composed of smooth, matte glass, create both organic and geometric shapes. Part of an ongoing Segmentation Series, the composite works consider the evolution of a single cell, which Lee expands on:

I work with glass that has transparency and translucency, two qualities that serve as perfect metaphors for what is known and unknown about life science. The segmented, geometrical forms of my work represent cells, embryos, biological and molecular structures—each symbolizing the building blocks of life as well as the starting point of life.

Lee … Read the rest

The Tate museum network in England said it has cut ties with Anthony d’Offay, a dealer who was accused of sexual harassment by multiple women in 2018. The museum network has faced pushback from the British art community over the past year after it quietly resumed contact with d’Offay following a brief period in which Tate said it would not work with d’Offay.

“Tate and Anthony d’Offay have agreed to end their relationship,” Tate and d’Offay said in a statement released on Friday. Tate also said it would return works that were on loan from d’Offay and a company registered in his name.

A 2018 Observer report first revealed the allegations of sexual harassment. The accusations came from several women—all of whom were not named in the report—who had worked with d’Offay; two had been employed by his London gallery, which closed in 2001. The women described alleged instances of … Read the rest

“Ciclotrama (expansão)” (2019), 4 Ciclotramas of “expansion” series with varied sizes, black and blue ropes, 270 x 600 x 400 centimeters. Zipper Galeria, São Paulo, Brazil. Photo by Gui Gomes. All images © Janaina Mello Landini, shared with permission

Janaina Mello Landini (previously) unbraids lengths of rope to create fibrous labyrinths that breach canvases’ edges and crawl from floor to ceiling. Including both sprawling site-specific installations and smaller pieces confined to a few dozen centimeters, the São Paulo-based artist’s body of work is broad. All of her projects, though, explore tension and space as they spread into arboreal forms or perfectly round networks.

Her recent works include a massive tree-like installation that fans out across Zipper Gallery’s floor and walls into delicate, tape blossoms. Another is a smaller, numbered piece that was born from the artist’s response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.  “My days are quite slow … Read the rest

After just 10 months as director, Christian Rattemeyer has departed New York’s SculptureCenter. Artforum first reported news of his departure on Friday morning.

According to Artforum, SculptureCenter, which is located in the Long Island City neighborhood of Queens, did not provide a reason for Rattemeyer’s departure. “I want to thank the incredibly talented staff and leadership at SculptureCenter,” Rattemeyer said in a statement. “I have enjoyed being part of an independent and artist-driven institution leading the conversation on contemporary art.”

Artist Carol Bove, the chair of SculptureCenter’s board, said in a statement, “On behalf of the entire board and staff of SculptureCenter, we thank Christian for his leadership, curatorial excellence, and global perspective. We wish him all the best in his future endeavors.”

On SculptureCenter’s website, Kyle Dancewicz, the institution’s director of exhibitions and programs, is listed as interim director.

Rattemeyer was named director of SculptureCenter in June … Read the rest

“Untitled” (2020), cast tinted hydrocal, 9 x 9 x 4 inches. All images © Joe Davidson, shared with permission

In varying states of deflation, Joe Davidson’s pastel balloons sag, slump, and flop in every direction. The limp, elongated forms are stacked on top of one another in seemingly precarious piles and resemble latex tubes filled with days-old air. While the sculptures are playful in both color and form, the Los Angeles-based artist notes that they also hold earnest themes of masculinity and aging, two concepts he’s thinking about often.

Davidson prefers to explore new materials and those beyond the bronze, stone, and wood typically used in this medium. “I was in a period about ten years ago where I was working exclusively in Scotch tape,” he shares. His more recent interest has been in plaster, which he uses to make the balloons. “There’s something about the malleability, chalkiness, and … Read the rest

Jean Dubuffet, one of the most famous European artists of the postwar era, had an imagination that knew no bounds. In his rough-hewn paintings, drawings, and sculptures ranging from abstraction to childlike figuration, he envisioned altered states in which humanity existed in a form that he believed was closer to its origins. A ceaseless experimenter in the way of materials and forms, he advocated for self-taught or “outsider” practitioners in the field.

These days, Dubuffet may be best known for his large-scale sculptures, which resemble masses of white organic forms sharply outlined in black. He had intended for Le cirque (1970) to be among his monumental ones, but it was never fully realized in a large-scale format—until now. Starting on September 18, Pace Gallery will show a newly fabricated version of Le cirque in its New York gallery. “He both imagined that these things eventually would become physically real … Read the rest

The organizers of Art Basel Miami Beach announced today that they had been forced to cancel the scheduled 2020 edition of the fair, which was set to take place during the first week of December in Florida. The news was announced after trading closed on the Swiss stock exchange, where the fair’s financially embattled parent company, MCH, is publicly traded.

“It is with great regret and disappointment that we announce the cancellation of our December show in Miami Beach, as we know how crucial our show is for our galleries, as well as for the greater Miami arts community and economy,” Noah Horowitz, Art Basel’s Americas director, said in a statement. “We thank everyone who shared their perspectives and insights with us over the past months and weeks and look forward to returning to Miami Beach next year to deliver a successful show.”

Among the main reasons cited for the … Read the rest