Upstate New York Town Government Demands Removal of Nick Cave Artwork

A giant work by Nick Cave on the facade of the School, an art space operated by Jack Shainman Gallery in Kinderhook, New York, is currently the subject of controversy among locals, the New York Times reports. The work, a 160-foot-long text piece called Truth Be Told, features its titular phrase splayed across the building and is intended to spur conversations among the community on policing and anti-Black racism justice in the wake of the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police in May.

Residents in Kinderhook have claimed it might be illegal to display the work. City officials have alleged that the artwork is technically a sign, making it in violation of local code. Shainman and his attorney, William J. Better, maintain that Truth Be Told is an artwork, and its display is protected by the special use permit that the School was granted when it opened Read the rest

A giant work by Nick Cave on the facade of the School, an art space operated by Jack Shainman Gallery in Kinderhook, New York, is currently the subject of controversy among locals, the New York Times reports. The work, a 160-foot-long text piece called Truth Be Told, features its titular phrase splayed across the building and is intended to spur conversations among the community on policing and anti-Black racism justice in the wake of the killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police in May.

Residents in Kinderhook have claimed it might be illegal to display the work. City officials have alleged that the artwork is technically a sign, making it in violation of local code. Shainman and his attorney, William J. Better, maintain that Truth Be Told is an artwork, and its display is protected by the special use permit that the School was granted when it opened Read the rest

Playfulness and Imagination Inform the Textured Wooden Sculptures of Artist Efraïm Rodríguez

“At line” (2020), linden wood and painted okume board, 115 x 55 x 43 centimeters. All images © Efraïm Rodríguez, shared with permission

From fallen trees, planks, and old furniture, Efraïm Rodríguez carves vivid sculptures that evoke the imaginative and playful daydreams of childhood. The Barcelona-based artist highlights the texture of the organic material, creating life-sized figures donning garments of veneered wood or whose bodies mimic the toys they stack. Many depict toddlers or younger children in the midst of play, and even the older characters are infused with elements of sport and recreation, like “Anna” (shown below) who wears a dress studded with tees and holds a golf ball.

Although the precisely sculpted figures often are based on his nieces, nephews, and other family members, Rodríguez tells Colossal that themes of childhood only recently emerged. He explains:

The children appeared in my work almost from the beginning, but they

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Storm King Becomes a Sensation: Why the Upstate New York Sculpture Park Is Now a Destination

Right now, the view from atop Museum Hill at the Storm King Art Center is one of the most sought-after vistas in Upstate New York. No doubt its natural surroundings are part of its allure: the picturesque Hudson Valley is visible below. But intimate installations can be spotted, too, and from the hilltop, Mark di Suvero’s sculpture Pyramidian (1987–98) can be seen rising against the horizon. 

There are indoor galleries nearby, but Storm King isn’t a museum in any static sense. Throughout its 60-year history, the sculpture park has more than doubled in size, with its borders currently occupying some 500 acres. Its curatorial ambitions have grown, too, and its landscape now accommodates pieces both permanent and ephemeral. During the current pandemic, with indoor museums seeming less appealing, the art center has become a bona fide destination—tickets are now selling out weeks in advance, making Storm King one of the Read the rest

Metaphorical Scenes Examine Mystery in Dreamy Paintings by Artist Duy Huynh

“ReciprociTea,” acrylic on canvas, 40 x 30 x 2.5 inches. All images © Duy Huynh, shared with permission

Vietnamese aritst Duy Huynh (previously) examines balance through nuanced scenes replete with ethereal, surreal elements: individual flowers ascend from a teapot, a chain winds around an artichoke heart, and figures float mid-air. Rendered in muted hues, the acrylic paintings are metaphorical and narrative-based, visualizing stories by connecting unsual symbols or positioning disparate objects together. The North Carolina-based artist gives the works witty names— “Thyme to Turnip the Beet” and “ReciprociTea,” for example—adding to their playful and whimsical natures.

In a statement, Huynh writes that the core of his practice involves drawing connections “between two or more mysteries,” which he explains further:

My characters often float (literally) somewhere between science and spirituality, memory and mythology, structure and spontaneity, ephemeral and eternal, humorous and profound, connectivity and non-attachment. The intent isn’t

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Art That Stirs Creativity: Roxane Gay, Westside Gunn, Jónsi, and More on Work That Inspires Them

For “Touchstones,” ARTnews asks creative figures from different disciplines—writers, musicians, filmmakers, chefs, and so on—about one artwork that has inspired them.

Westside Gunn
Rapper, creator of albums including Pray for Paris and Who Made the Sunshine, founder of Griselda Records…

…on Caravaggio, David with the Head of Goliath (1610) [pictured above]

It was Virgil Abloh’s idea to use David with the Head of Goliath for my album Pray for Paris. When he was doing his Pyrex Vision clothes back in the day, he was using those kinds of images already. We thought we should take it back to the beginning because the year he started Pyrex was the same year I started rapping. When I had the opportunity to have him design a cover, I wanted him to take it back to what introduced me to him. And I felt like Pray for ParisRead the rest

In ‘Open Studio’ Book, Marina Abramović, Wangechi Mutu, and Others Offer Art Projects to Make at Home

Finding a starting point can sometimes be the hardest part of making art. Open Studio, a new book published by Phaidon, aims to help out in that respect with step-by-step guides to the artistic process from 17 high-profile artists including Marina Abramović, George Condo, Alex Israel, Rashid Johnson, KAWS, Maya Lin, Julie Mehretu, Wangechi Mutu, and Mickalene Thomas.

In the book’s introduction, authors Sharon Coplan Hurowitz (an independent curator and publisher) and Amanda Benchley (a filmmaker and journalist) hope that readers trying their hand “will translate, adopt, or even reject some of the information to reflect your own creative voice.” They continue: “Putting aside their art-world stature, each artist approached this challenge as a one-to-one exchange, collaborating with you.”

The entries include images from inside artists’ studios and biographical information about their lives, practices, and how their careers took shape. And directions for each artist’s project … Read the rest

Immerse Yourself in the ‘Bob Ross Experience,’ a Permanent Exhibit Dedicated to the Beloved Painter

Bob Ross on the set of The Joy of Painting. All images © Minnetrista, shared with permission

In the small city of Muncie, Indiana stands a three-story house with white columns lining the front stoop. Now unassuming, the brick structure formerly featured a sign at its entrance reading “WIPB TV,” denoting the camera crew inside recording beloved icon Bob Ross, who filmed more than 400 episodes of The Joy of Painting in the space from 1983 to 1994. Today, the house has been transformed to honor the legacy of the PBS artist, whose joyful manner and positivity inspired his devoted fans for more than a decade.

Formally called the Bob Ross Experience, the $1.2 million permanent exhibit and masterclass series pays homage to the painter by recreating the set where his soothing voice echoed instructions on blending pinks and blues for a sky or adding highlights. A rotating selection … Read the rest

Embattled Philip Guston Exhibition Gets New Itinerary, Beginning in Boston in 2022

After almost a month and a half of fierce debate over the postponement of a much-anticipated retrospective of postwar artist Philip Guston, the exhibition has a new itinerary beginning with an opening now planned for Boston in May 2022.

Other dates for the exhibition—which had previously been delayed until as late as 2024—include openings in October 2022 at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, in February 2023 at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and in October 2023 at Tate Modern in London.

In a lengthy statement announcing the new dates, Matthew Teitelbaum, the MFA Boston’s director, said, “For me, making the decision to postpone this show was not, as some have claimed, the silencing of an artist; it is, on the contrary, a commitment to putting the Museum at the center of these conversations and creating a public space for in-depth discussions about great art … Read the rest

Sound Artist Zimoun Channels Frenetic Movement in Expansive Kinetic Sculptures and Installations



Swiss sound artist Zimoun (previously) harnesses the power of quick, chaotic movements in his large-scale installations and kinetic sculptures. Each artwork is composed of simple materials like cardboard boxes, wooden dowels, and cotton balls, among other common objects. Zimoun assembles multiples of the same configuration—think teetering sticks and metal washers suspended on a wire—and motorizes one portion, causing them to rattle back and forth.

Because each component is made by hand, they have slight differences that prevent them from synchronizing, despite all the motors being connected to a single current. The frenzied movements contrast the calming, whirring sounds the artworks emit, which mimic raindrops or a repetitive drum. This juxtaposition is just one example of the many comparisons the artist draws: chaos vs. order, mass vs. individual, simplicity vs. complexity, and manufactured vs. organic.

Considering this theme, Zimoun names each piece by listing the materials used to … Read the rest

Art Fairs Are Canceled Almost Everywhere. But With Virus Under Control in South Korea, the Show Goes On

This has been the year without Art Basels, without Friezes, without TEFAFs, and in most parts of the world, all other art fairs of the kind—physical ones, with collectors strolling the aisles and dealers making their pitches—are still a long way off. But in the Asia-Pacific realm, where the coronavirus pandemic is comparatively under control, some of the events are proceeding apace, albeit in altered forms.

On Thursday in South Korea, Art Busan & Design opened its doors to VIPs at the Busan Exhibition and Convention Center for its ninth edition. There are 60 exhibitors, including Kukje, Lehmann Maupin, Hyundai, Gladstone, and Thaddaeus Ropac, as well as temperature checks, mask requirements, and a strictly limited number of tickets.

The annual showcase typically runs in May, but in mid-March, with infection rates exploding around the globe, Art Busan’s organizers opted to postpone it to the second half of the … Read the rest