Corrie Francis Parks’s absorbing stop-motion short “Foreign Exchange” is all about perspective. Through a continuously evolving landscape of minuscule stones and banknotes, mini-universes emerge that meld the two materials into culturally significant tableaus. “Between the dazzling layers of currency and sand lie connections that can be mined in infinite ways. Each person who views this film will unearth different associations filtered through their worldly experience and national background,” Parks says.

Although the sand shown is small in quantity—Parks can hold all of it in her two hands—it’s sourced from more than 50 countries just like the paper currency, and both materials converge in a perpetual juxtaposition of culture, economics, and nature. The rocks flow across the screen like water and animals, while the colorful collages of ripped money contrast distinct national figures and heritage against a universal economic backdrop. “Canada’s interstellar pride meshes with the gothic arches of Prague’s St. … Read the rest

To assert culpability, one must show that the peoples in societies and cultures past had the means to establish customs other than the ones they did.

best song ever music video characters

Perhaps you’re wondering what are the best easy piano songs to learn? This is a very lovely hub, Peggy! picplzthumbs I’ve been to most of these California National Parks, and it’s hard to pick just one favorite place. They’re all amazing. I love all the photos in this hub; they made me want to go to the parks I have not yet visited and revisit the ones I’ve already been to. This number is unique, simply because it brought together two young singers who were destined to achieve legendary fame in classical vocal music. Pt. Bhimsen Joshi, one of the greatest Indian classical singers, joins Mannade, one of the greatest singers of Bollywood songs based on Hindustani classical … Read the rest

A stamped seal in the ancient village of Tel Tsaf dating to the 5th millennium B.C.E. has been unearthed, according to a study in the journal Levant by archaeologists Michael Freikman and David Ben-Shlomo, of the University of Ariel and Yosef Garfinkel of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, respectively.

Of the nearly 150 seals that have been uncovered at the Tel Tsaf site, this one is the only stamped one. Additionally, it is the oldest stamped seal ever recovered in Israel.

In the 5th millennium B.C.E., Tel Tsaf wealthy inhabitants had the means to purchase goods from Mesopotamia, Turkey, Egypt, and the Caucasus. The study suggests that the stamped seal could be a sign of the region’s rich trade system, and that it was related to administrative practices. A seal would have been used to identify an individual, so it may have been used to authenticate documents.

The stamped seal’s … Read the rest

“Losing the last rights” (2021), oil on canvas, 200 x 120 centimeters. All images © Stamatis Laskos, shared with permission

Fantastically tall figures with elongated limbs and torsos inhabit the distorted, mysterious realities painted by artist Stamatis Laskos (previously). The highly stylized artworks, which extend upwards of six feet, imagine a universe marred by unknown destruction: an elderly man wades through waist-high water while fire burns in the background, a woman retrieves a human skeleton from a flood, and a self-portrait shows the artist shielding his eyes with detached hands. Working with Earth tones and an implied dim light, Laskos shrouds each scene with shadow, which obscures the figures’ faces and casts an eerie tension over the degraded environments.

At once distant and deeply personal, each painting draws on ideas of collective unconscious and Jungian archetypes, whether portrayed through wise figures, an apocalypse, or the unification of opposing forces. … Read the rest

Daniel Sallick is board chair of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., and a founding partner of Subject Matter, a creative advocacy firm based in the city. The views expressed here are his own.

The art world has been invigorated in the past year by the notion that equity and inclusion should be mandates rather than mere abstract concepts. But while we’re good at hashtags, putting on fundraisers, and lifting up what we believe should be ideals, it’s time to walk the walk and lobby Washington to usher in a much more ambitious and nimble approach to the federal government’s role in the arts. We can’t continue to wait and see which way the political winds blow. We must summon the art world’s collective power to set a new and bold agenda for making access to the arts a fundamental component of education in America.

There are … Read the rest

All images © Robyn Rich, shared with permission

The Georgian era saw the rise in a jewelry trend that’s equally sentimental and peculiar: to remember spouses who had died or to honor clandestine affairs without revealing anyone’s identity, people would commission tiny renderings of a person’s eye to be painted on broaches, rings, and other accessories they could carry with them. Similar to a lock of hair or portrait hidden in a locket, the abstracted feature was anonymous and indiscernible to most but deeply personal to the wearer.

Robyn Rich evokes this centuries-old fad with a substantial body of work that nestles minuscule oil paintings into cutlery, tins, and other antique vessels. “With a love of reusing and recycling, the found objects I use give a simple and often nostalgic canvas, which offers little distraction, allowing the beauty of the eye to be the focus,” she says. “These objects that … Read the rest

A priceless set of Raphael tapestries is in peril after pigeons and their droppings made an appearance at a Spanish exhibition. The nine tapestries currently on display in the main gallery of Madrid’s royal palace have survived the last 500 years in near-pristine condition. But gallery staff are now scrambling to keep the winged pests from inflicting damage, the Guardian reports.

The tapestries, titled Acts of the Apostles, were commissioned by Pope Leo X in 1515 as decoration for the Sistine Chapel. After Raphael completed the sketches, which detail scenes from the lives of St. Peter and Paul, they were sent to a workshop in Brussels, which translated the designs into life-size hangings spun from gold and silver silk and wool threads. Acts of the Apostles are the artist’s only known tapestry designs and the last major project he completed before his death in 1520. Impressed with the work, European

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All images © Jörg Gläscher, shared with permission

As the fear of a second wave of COVID-19 swept through Germany in the fall of 2020, photographer and artist Jörg Gläscher decided to channel his own worry into a project that felt similarly vast and domineering. “I was working (with the idea of) the pure power of nature, the all-destroying force, which brings one of the richest countries in the world to a completely still stand,” he tells Colossal. “A wave is a periodic oscillation or a unique disturbance the state of a system.”

Between November 2020 and March 2021, Gläscher spent his days in a secluded location near Hamburg, where he gathered deadwood and constructed nine massive crests—the largest of which spans four meters high and nine meters wide—that overwhelm the forest floor in undulating layers of branches and twigs. Each iteration, which he photographed and then promptly destroyed in … Read the rest

A little known mural created by Keith Haring in a Barcelona club in 1989 is at risk of being demolished to make way for an elder care facility, according to a report by the Guardian.

The red mural in Haring’s signature style, depicting a figure with a flower for a head, was a tribute to the acid house music scene of the time. After the club’s closing in 1993, the venue became a billiards hall. The owners revealed that they were planning to demolish the building—and, with it, the Haring mural. Since the announcement, there has been a scramble to determine the fate the mural, including if it could be safely removed and possibly sold.

The manager of the billiards hall, Gabriel Carral, told the Guardian, that the Keith Haring Foundation offed to buy the mural for €80,000 (or roughly $97,000), as well as the cost of removing … Read the rest

“Enjoying the View” by Romain Laurent

Every month, Colossal shares a selection of opportunities for artists and designers, including open calls, grants, fellowships, and residencies. If you’d like to list an opportunity here, please get in touch at hello@colossal.art. You can also join our monthly Opportunities Newsletter.

 

Open Calls

The Other Art Fair Featured
The Other Art Fair presented by Saatchi Art is tailor-made to support independent artists. Each fair attracts thousands of art lovers looking to buy directly from a curated collection of artists, whether as first-time buyers or seasoned collectors. Free applications are now open for Los Angeles, Chicago, and Sydney, with other locations opening soon.
Deadline: Variable based on city.

Hot Summer City: Street Photography Exhibition
Vestige Concept Gallery is hosting an open call for street photography that captures the essence of summer in the city. Whether focused on late nights and outdoor fun or the … Read the rest