MASP, Brazil’s Most Important Modern Art Museum, Plans Expansion – ARTnews.com

The Museu de Arte de São Paulo, Brazil’s preeminent modern and contemporary art museum, is set to grow, with an expansion that is likely to further cement its reputation as one of the most important art institutions in Latin America or anywhere in the world. Slated to open in January 2024, the new space will add nearly 75,000 square feet to the museum.

The addition will take the form of a new 14-story structure separate from the museum’s famed two-story building, which was designed by pioneering Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi in 1968. The new facility, named after her husband Pietro Maria Bardi, who cofounded the museum, will be connected to MASP’s current edifice by an underground tunnel.

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Included in the expansion are an additional 28,000 square feet of exhibition space spread across five floors, growing the museum’s galleries by 66 percent. The increase is intended to allow

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Rising Star Dies of Cancer at 49 – ARTnews.com

Kaari Upson, a Los Angeles–based artist whose work hints at eerie forms of loss and twinning, has died at 49. Margot Norton, a New Museum curator who organized a 2017 solo show of Upson’s work, announced the news on Instagram on Thursday, saying that the artist had died of metastatic cancer on Wednesday.

“Kaari was a force of nature and a beautiful human being,” said Jay Jopling, the founder of White Cube gallery, which represents Upson. “Her work powerfully skewered the fallacies of the American dream.”

Upson’s sculptures, videos, and performances have been seen widely in world-class biennials and major solo shows over the past decade. They enlist inanimate objects, often ones associated with home decor and architecture, to render absent figures mysteriously present. Tattered and sometimes slightly decrepit, her sculptures conjure the unseen people who once owned them.

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For much of her career, Upson undertook an ongoing

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Hermitage Museum to Sell Monet, Leonardo Paintings as NFTs – ARTnews.com

The State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, is minting several masterpieces from its collection as NFTs. The sale of NFT versions of works by Claude Monet, Vincent van Gogh, and Leonardo da Vinci will take place at the end of August on the Binance online marketplace.

The museum, located in the Winter Palace of the tsars, had to work around Russia’s strict restrictions on cryptocurrencies to organize the sale. Recent cryptocurrency legislation in the country placed limitations on the use of digital assets as monetary currency.

Mikhail Piotrovsky, the general director of the Hermitage, said in a statement that the sale was “an important stage in the development of the relationship between person and money, person and thing,” adding that NFTs “create democracy, make luxury more accessible, but are at the same time exceptional and exclusive.”

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Headed to sale are NFTs of Leonardo’s Madonna Litta, Judith

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France Acquires Two Fragonard Paintings Long Thought To Be Missing – ARTnews.com

France has added to its national collections two paintings by Jean-Honoré Fragonard that were thought to be missing until 2017. Both will now be displayed at the Musée Fabre in Montpellier.

Titled Le Jeu de la Palette (The Paddle Game) and La Bascule (The Seesaw), both ca. 1760-65, they feature landscapes overflowing with greenery, with small figures playing beneath grand Neoclassical structures.

Four years ago, the paintings re-emerged when a family discovered them while inventorying a castle in Normandy. The last known record of the two works before that was a 1786 document of their sale to Pierre Bergeret de Grandcourt, a French aristocrat and a friend of Fragonard. The family that had found the paintings applied for an export license to sell the works abroad, but the French state barred the paintings from leaving the country, declaring them national treasures.

The French Ministry of Culture did not say how

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Abstract Painter Dies at 82 – ARTnews.com

Louise Fishman, whose stylish paintings synthesized modernist abstraction with her identity as a queer Jewish feminist, died in New York on Monday at 82. A representative for Karma, the New York gallery that represents her, confirmed her death.

“The world has lost a formidable painter, activist and friend, whose pursuit of individual freedom and personal expression was her primary motivation as an artist,” Karma wrote in a statement posted to Instagram. “Her death leaves a tremendous void in the art world.”

At first glance, Fishman’s abstractions, many of which feature dense layerings of thick strokes arranged in all-over compositions, appear to be in line with those of white male painters of the first half of the 20th century. Yet Fishman’s paintings tweak those artists’ formulae in subtle yet profound ways, showing how a gestural paint stroke could be intimately connected to one’s identity. In the postwar era, Abstract Expressionists engineered

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Who Is Alma Thomas, and Why Is She Important? – ARTnews.com

In 1963, Alma Thomas set out to turn Henri Matisse on his head. Two years before, in 1961, she attended a show of Henri Matisse’s late-career gouaches at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. There, she saw The Snail (1952–53), in which cut-and-pasted squares of colorful paper are arranged in a spiral-like shape, abstractly alluding to a gastropod without ever outright showing it.

Thomas got to work, effectively recreating the iconic Matisse gouache with a twist. Her version, titled Watusi (Hard Edge), likewise contains a jumble of rectangles, rhombuses, and squares. Look closely, however, and you realize that Thomas has rotated Matisse’s composition 90 degrees. The medium has changed, from gouache to acrylic on canvas, and arguably, the subject matter has changed, too. Judging by Thomas’s title, no longer does the work refer to an animal. Now, it may call to mind a dance style popular in

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How Akiane Convinced The World She Wasn’t Crazy

It is a great place to view new artists’ work, and it’s in a really lovely location as well. I know what you mean about Utah being an incredible state to visit.

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When you’re feeling down, sad, stressed out, or lonely, watching funny shows will help you cheer up. One best suggestion would be watching Running Man, a popular Korean variety show that is guaranteed to make you laugh wholeheartedly. I’m ashamed to say I’ve never heard of this guy, but his paintings are wonderful – full of life and texture. Nice Hub, John. National Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian Museum of American Art – (2 hours) – We were able to review quite a bit of American History while walking through these two museums, which are connected by a fabulous courtyard. The courtyard is covered and has a small water area for the kids to … Read the rest

L.A. Dealer Douglas Chrismas Arrested on Embezzlement Charges – ARTnews.com

Douglas Chrismas, a longtime Los Angeles gallerist whose reputation began to dim around a decade ago after allegations of suspicious business dealings, was arrested by the Federal Bureau of Investigations on Tuesday on charges that he embezzled more than $260,000 from the bankruptcy estate of his now-defunct Ace Gallery.

Chrismas is currently facing three charges of embezzlement. If convicted of all three, the 77-year-old dealer could face a sentence of 15 years in federal prison. He has pleaded not guilty to all of the charges and is expected to face trial in September.

A now-unsealed indictment from March accused Chrismas of embezzling $264,595 from the bankruptcy estate. The indictment, filed in the Central District Court of California, alleged that he embezzled $100,000 owed to the gallery as part of a purchase of an artwork from a third party, and put that sum toward his own corporation. Chrismas is also accused

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Frank Gehry’s Signature Curves Translate to Fishy Art at Gagosian – ARTnews.com

Frank Gehry says he aimed to capture the brushstroke effect of Vincent van Gogh’s Starry Night in his latest building, making his tower for the Luma Foundation in Arles, France one of many examples of his corny artistic ambitions. Inklings of these are evident even in his sketches—impassioned, nearly illegible scribbles more likely to be exhibited in a museum than referenced by a contractor or client. Gehry is famous for privileging form over function, often to the point of controversy. In Cleveland and in Cambridge, his unconventional roof shapes have produced dangerous avalanches on snowy days. And his sinuous museums have been accused of upstaging the artworks they’re meant to show—to which Gehry’s friend Julian Schnabel has retorted, “Maybe that art isn’t good enough.”

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In one of several origin stories Gehry has offered—and also disavowed—he traces his obsession with undulating forms back to a formative childhood memory, when

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Banksy’s West Bank Barrier Artwork to Be Auctioned as an NFT – ARTnews.com

In 2005, Banksy acquired a piece of Israel’s West Bank Barrier and used it for a “treasure hunt.” The first person to find the rock and email him with the secret word he wrote on it—”Spike”—would get to keep the work.

The piece, titled Spike, was found in Palestine and has since traded hands a few times. Now, it is heading to auction—not as a physical object but as an NFT.

Valuart, a new NFT platform, launched with the auction of Spike on July 22. Bidding will continue until July 30 online. Notably, the elusive street artist artist is not involved in the minting or sale of the work. Instead, the Italian opera singer Vittorio Grigolo, who owns Spike and cofounded Valuart, was the one who worked with the platform to create the NFT.

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The NFT features a CGI rendering of Spike slowly spinning in the long

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