September 27, 2020

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Your life is Art

DegreeArt.com The Original Online Art Gallery

Get up-to-date information on weekly flyer features, Rollback & clearance items, exclusive products, and Walmart offers. Abstract Expressionism was born from the common experience of artists living in 1940s New York. Two World Wars, the Great Depression, atomic devastation and an ensuing Cold War prompted early works reflecting the darkness of these times, and fed into the movement’s concerns with contemplation, expression and freedom. Pavlicevic, M. (2010). Playtime at Work. In M. Pavlicevic, A. D. Santos & H. Oosthuizen (Eds.), Taking Music Seriously: Stories from South African Music Therapy (pp. 163-177). South Africa: Music Therapy Community Clinic. Langmeyer, A., Guglhör-Rudan, A., & Tarnai, C. (2012). What do music preferences reveal about personality? A cross-cultural replication using self-ratings and ratings of music samples. Journal of Individual Differences, 33(2), 119-130. LandEscape explores the early 20th century American modernists who exhibited their innovative paintings at the groundbreaking 1913 Armory Show, and compares it to the work of artists from the 21st century who have rediscovered and reinvigorated the genre. This show is comprised of approximately 30 works and reveals how a diverse range of artists broke from the established landscape painting traditions of their predecessors to create a new visual language that profoundly changed the way landscape was perceived. Artists such as Marsden Hartley, John Marin, Alfred Maurer, Helen Torr and Marguerite Zorach all engaged with what was considered to be an unexceptional genre. One hundred years later the same innovative impulse has once again emerged in the works of contemporary artists Jo Baer, Lois Dodd, April Gornik, Shara Hughes, Alex Katz and Judy Pfaff who have again reinterpreted the landscape. Curated by Olga Dekalo. McFerran, K. (2015). Music Therapy in the Schools. In B. L. Wheeler (Ed.), Music Therapy Handbook (pp. 328-340). London; New York: Guilford Press. Sibony, Gedi et al. In the Still Ephiphany. Exh. cat. St. Louis: The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, 2012: 16, 20-21, 46-49, 52, 58. Broadway Boogie Woogie (1942-3) Museum of Modern Art, New York. To understand how “modern art” began, a little historical background is useful. The 19th century was a time of significant and rapidly increasing change. As a result of the Industrial Revolution (c.1760-1860) enormous changes in manufacturing, transport, and technology began to affect how people lived, worked, and travelled, throughout Europe and America. Towns and cities swelled and prospered as people left the land to populate urban factories. These industry-inspired social changes led to greater prosperity but also cramped and crowded living conditions for most workers. In turn, this led to: more demand for urban architecture; more demand for applied art and design – see, for instance the Bauhaus School – and the emergence of a new class of wealthy entrepreneurs who became art collectors and patrons. Many of the world’s best art museums were founded by these 19th century tycoons.