September 20, 2020

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American Abstract expressionist painter Franz Kline was born on May 23rd 1910 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Oldfield, A., & Bunce, L. (2001). ‘Mummy can play too…’ Short-term music therapy with mothers and young children. British Journal of Music Therapy, 15(1), 27-36. Silverman, M.J. (2008). Quantitative comparison of cognitive behavioral therapy and music therapy research: A methodological best-practices analysis to guide future investigation for adult psychiatric patients. Journal of Music Therapy, 45(4), 457-506. Bhana, V., & Botha, A. (2014). The therapeutic use of music as experienced by cardiac surgery patients of an intensive care unit. Health SA Gesondheid, 19(1), 1-9. Laurens’ earlier works seemed influenced by Auguste Rodin’s style. In 1911, the artist met Georges Braque. Their wives were childhood friends. Braque later introduced Henri to Pablo Picasso, and the three struck a lifelong friendship. By 1912, Laurens started exploring the sculptural possibilities of ‘Cubism.’ He combined painting and sculpting to produce a revolutionary body of works. “Bottle and Glass” (1915), “Figure” (1917), “Mask” (1918), and “Guitar” (1918), are some of his ‘Cubist’ style works. Picasso liked Henri’s works and introduced him to the art dealer, Léonce Rosenberg, who often bought his works and even supported him during the World War. Meanwhile, in 1915, Henri illustrated a book of his author friend, Pierre Reverdy. Temporary Tattoos performed at corporate functions through to private events. The Chrysler Museum: Selections from the Permanent Collection, Norfolk, Virginia. Norfolk, VA: Chrysler Museum of Art, 1982. Another interesting conjecture relates music to human anxiety related to death, and the consequent quest for meaning. Dissanayake (2009), for example, has argued that humans have used music to help cope with awareness of life’s transitoriness. In a manner similar to religious beliefs about the hereafter or a higher transcendental purpose, music can help assuage human anxiety concerning mortality. Neurophysiological studies regarding music-induced chills can be interpreted as congruent with this conjecture. For example, music-induced chills produce reduced activity in brain structures associated with anxiety (Blood and Zatorre, 2001). Related ideas stress the role music plays in feelings of transcendence. For example, (Frith, 1996, p. 275) has noted that: We all hear the music we like as something special, as something that defies the mundane, takes us out of ourselves,” puts us somewhere else.” Thus, music may provide a means of escape. The experience of flow states (Nakamura and Csikszentmihalyi, 2009), peaks (Maslow, 1968), and chills (Panksepp, 1995), which are often evoked by music listening, might similarly be interpreted as forms of transcendence or escapism (see also Fachner, 2008).

Allan Stone Gallery, New York. Arshile Gorky: Paintings and Drawings. 14 November – 22 December 1972. Wigram, T. (1993). Music Therapy Research to Meet the Demands of Health and Education Services: Research and Literature Analysis. In M. Heal & T. Wigram (Eds.), Music Therapy in Health and Education (pp. 126-136). London: Jessica Kingsley. Brotons, M., & Martí, P. (2003). Music therapy with Alzheimer’s patients and their family caregivers: A pilot project. Journal of Music Therapy, 40, 138-150. Lois Dodd’s work has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions throughout the United States, including Ogunquit Museum of American Art, ME (2018); Colby College Museum of Art, Waterville, ME (2014); Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, ME (2004); Montclair Art Museum, NJ (1996); and Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (1990). A retrospective organised in 2012 by the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, travelled to Portland Museum of Art, ME, the following year. From 1971 to 1992, Dodd taught at Brooklyn College, NY. She has also held positions at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, and Vermont Studio Center. Her work can be found in collections including The Art Institute of Chicago; Hall Art Foundation, Holle; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; and Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven. In Autumn 2017, a major monograph was published by Lund Humphries. A new publication by Modern Art will be released on the occasion of the exhibition. Here’s a 60-second intro to the enigmatic work of Clyfford Still, one of the leading Abstract Expressionist painters. Why is he less known in the UK than the likes of Rothko and Pollock? The RA’s Artistic Director Tim Marlow explains. We regularly hold new exhibitions in the gallery. Music is a binding factor in our social milieu; it is a feature with and about us, a universal still shrouded in endless mystery. Music cuts across diverse cognitive capabilities and resources, including numeracy, language, and spacial perception. In the same way, music intersects with cultural boundaries, facilitating our social self” by linking our shared experiences and intentions. Perhaps one primordial influence is the social interaction of parental attachments, which are fundamental to gaining a foothold in the social milieu, learning, and surviving; music and song are conduits for forging links across barriers, for making contact with others, and for being indoctrinated with the social milieu.

Oh, Martie, people always make a fuss about languages because a language is a big part of identity (and ownership). They may (and will) resist, revolt and make artificial rules, but in the end, the practical aspect of communication wins. Specializes in Face painting, Airbrush, Body Paint, Glitter Arts, & Stilt Walking. Sung, H.C., Lee, W.L., Li, T.L., & Watson, R. (2012). A group music intervention using percussion instruments with familiar music to reduce anxiety and agitation of institutionalized older adults with dementia. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 27(6), 621-627. Xavier Fourcade, Inc., New York. Arshile Gorky: Important Paintings and Drawings. 3 – 28 April 1979. Catalogue. 4. According to Carl Holty, when Kandinsky went to Russia in 1914 and due to the war was unable to return to Munich, Hofmann had charge of the paintings Kandinsky had left behind; interview with Nina Wayne, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., roll 670. Loonar Designs provides Body Painting for corporate events ,promotions and club nights. Music therapists can use the lyric discussion to help patients identify their specific problems or understand them better. Musical lyrics often bring up intense feelings, giving the therapist a chance to help the patient deal with them. Wright, Edward and Robin Fior. Painting & Sculpture of a Decade 54 64. Revised, 2nd edition. Exh. cat. London: Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation and Tate Gallery, 1964. McNeil, George. American Abstractionists Venerable at Twenty.” ARTnews 55, no. 3 (May 1956): pp. 34-35, 64-66. Studies have found that music is effective in decreasing stress preoperatively, postoperatively, and generally for the patient and the family members and friends. Patients who listened to music while waiting for surgery subjectively reported lower anxiety and also displayed lower blood pressure and pulse rates than those who did not. Generally, persons who listened to music during a hospital stay displayed lower anxiety scores than those who did not. Postoperative patients have pointed out the comforting aspect of music, and described a greater sense of control of their surroundings (McCaffrey & Locsin, 2004). Music is even effective in antenatal clinics. Hearing live performances of music significantly increased the number of accelerations in the fetal heartbeat, signaling good health (Art and Music, 2004). Infants as young as two months incline their attention toward pleasant consonant sounds and away from unpleasant dissonant sounds (Weinberger, 2004). Greenberg, Clement. America Takes the Lead, 1945-1965” (includes artist’s statements). Part VI of The Artist Speaks” segment presented by the Archives of American Art. Art in America 53, no. 4 (August-September 1965): pp. 108-29.