September 24, 2020

Pic.Thumbs

Your life is Art

Modern Art, Contemporary Digital Artist By Paul Cooklin

Inspired by the radical innovations of late 19th-century painters and sculptors, 20th-century modernists pushed art to new frontiers of expression and abstraction, rewriting the rules about what constituted art and how its materials could be used. Art Nouveau is an international style of art, architecture and applied art, especially the decorative arts, known in different languages by different names: Jugendstil in German, Stile Liberty in Italian, Modernisme in Catalan, etc. In English it is also known as the Modern Style (not to be confused with Modernism and Modern architecture). The style was most popular between 1890 and 1910. It was a reaction against the academic art, eclecticism and historicism of 19th century architecture and decoration. It was often inspired by natural forms such as the sinuous curves of plants and flowers. Other characteristics of Art Nouveau were a sense of dynamism and movement, often given by asymmetry or “whiplash” curves, and the use of modern materials, particularly iron, glass, ceramics and later concrete, to create unusual forms and larger open spaces. One major objective of Art Nouveau was to break down the traditional distinction between fine arts (especially painting and sculpture) and applied arts. It was most widely used in interior design, graphic arts, furniture, glass art, textiles, ceramics, jewelry and metal work. The style responded to leading 19-century theoreticians, such as French architect Eugène-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc (1814-1879) and British art critic John Ruskin (1819-1900). In Britain, it was influenced by William Morris and the Arts and Crafts movement. German architects and designers sought a spiritually uplifting Gesamtkunstwerk (total work of art”) that would unify the architecture, furnishings, and art in the interior in a common style, to uplift and inspire the residents. The first Art Nouveau houses and interior decoration appeared in Brussels in the 1890s, in the architecture and interior design of houses designed by Paul Hankar, Henry Van de Velde, and especially Victor Horta, whose Hôtel Tassel was completed in 1893. It moved quickly to Paris, where it was adapted by Hector Guimard, who saw Horta’s work in Brussels and applied the style for the entrances of the new Paris Metro. It reached its peak at the 1900 Paris International Exposition, which introduced the Art Nouveau work of artists such as Louis Tiffany. It appeared in graphic arts in the posters of Alphonse Mucha, and the glassware of René Lalique and Émile Gallé. From Belgium and France, it spread to the rest of Europe, taking on different names and characteristics in each country (see Naming section below). It often appeared not only in capitals, but also in rapidly growing cities that wanted to establish artistic identities (Turin and Palermo in Italy; Glasgow in Scotland; Munich and Darmstadt in Germany), as well as in centres of independence movements (Helsinki in Finland, then part of the Russian Empire; Barcelona in Catalonia, Spain). By 1910, Art Nouveau’s influence had faded. It was replaced as the dominant European architectural and decorative style first by Art Deco and then by Modernism. Then it was reborn in the 1960’s in America.

Hear about key works from curators and practicing contemporary artists and listen to a piece of music composed for the Rothko Chapel. The guide will also showcase rare photographs offering insights into the artists’ techniques and working methods. Thomas Nozkowski: Works On Paper 1991-2008 (exhibition catalogue). Interview with the artist by Betsy Senior. New York: Senior & Shopmaker Gallery, 2010. The artist; sold through the Downtown Gallery to the Art Institute of Chicago, 1944. For the collection of data, participants listened to an excerpt and then filled out a short survey consisting of the following three questions: “Does this piece sound happy or sad?” “Do you like this music?” and “How would you describe this music?” For the first question children circled either a happy or a sad face; response options for the second question were thumb up, thumb down, or thumb and fingers making an “ok” sign. Lines were provided for the children to respond in a free operant manner to the last question. Children listened to an excerpt (approximately one minute long) and then answered the three questions in their booklet. Children participated in the project in groups of approximately 20 in a classroom with desks and chairs and a portable CD player. Thomas Nozkowski: Drawings (exhibition catalogue). Text by Barry Schwabsky. New York: New York Studio School, 2003. Annual Exhibition 1960: Contemporary Sculpture and Drawings. Exh. cat. New York: Whitney Museum of American Art, 1960. Trondalen, G. (2011). Music Is About Feelings: Music Therapy with a Young Man Suffering From Anorexia Nervosa. In A. Meadows (Ed.), Developments in Music Therapy Practice: Case Study Perspectives (pp. 234-252). Gilsum, NH: Barcelona. Dunbar, N. (2010). Quietening the voices: Making a space for music in individual music therapy with an elderly refugee. British Journal of Music Therapy, 23(2), 25-31. Wylie, Charles. Block Island II, 1960 and Green Blue Red, 1963.” Ellsworth Kelly in Dallas. Exh. cat. Dallas: Dallas Museum of Art, 2004: 18. Neo-Minimalism is an art movement of the late 20th and 21st century. As a part of Post Modern Art, Neo-minimalism brought Minimalist Art closer to Meditative Art by paving way to contemplation for the viewer. In removing the excesses, as Meditative Art form, Neo-minimalism tries to help the viewer analyze the subject and transcend to a higher plane of consciousness. Besides an artist’s genius in painting, it also tries to express the greater will through its concept and creation. Allen, R., Hill, E., & Heaton, P. (2009). ‘Hath charms to soothe…’ An exploratory study of how high-functioning adults with ASD experience music. Autism, 13(1), 21-41.

Karen Wilkin: Hans Hofmann: The Last Decade. Major Paintings, 1955-1965. An Homage to Andre Emmerich. The Late years. Yares Art, 745 Fifth Avenue; May 6 – July 1, 2017. Procter, S. (2006). What Are We Playing At? Social Capital and Music Therapy. In R. Edwards, J. Franklin & J. Holland (Eds.), Assessing Social Capital: Concept, Policy and Practice (pp. 146-162). Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press. Photolithography is a process used in microfabrication to pattern parts of a thin film or the bulk of a substrate. It uses light to transfer a geometric pattern from a photomask to a light-sensitive chemical “photoresist”, or simply “resist,” on the substrate. A series of chemical treatments then either engraves the exposure pattern into the material or enables deposition of a new material in the desired pattern upon the material underneath the photo resist. For example, in complex integrated circuits, a modern CMOS wafer will go through the photolithographic cycle up to 50 times. Musée du Jeu de Paume, Paris (organized in collaboration with the Museum of Modern Art, New York). Trois siècles d’art aux États-Unis. May – July 1938. Catalogue with text by A. Conger Goodyear. John Sell Cotman (16 May 1782 – 24 July 1842) was an artist of the Norwich school and an associate of John Crome. He was born in Norwich, England and worked primarily in watercolour but also produced architectural etchings and drawings. His carefully observed and meticulous paintings have a very serene feel to them, like this example, painted in Co. Durham (then part of North Yorkshire) in1805. The bridge itself is known as Rutherford Bridge, and was built in 1773. It was named after a medieval village which has since been lost. Acquisitions.” Gallery Notes (Memorial Art Gallery, University of Rochester) 42, no. 10 (May 1977): p. 1. Amsterdam is one of Europe’s most visited cities and the Van Gogh Museum is one of the most visited sights within the city. Van Gogh’s story of tragedy and genius resonates with millions of people around the world, many of whom come here to marvel at over 200 paintings, 500 drawings and 750 personal letters. The Google Arts & Culture tool now offers access to the entire museum, allowing you to get up close and personal with some of the most treasured artwork in the world. Ketner, Joseph D. A Defining Generation.” A Defining Generation: Then and Now, 1961 and 2001. Massachuetts: The Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, 2001: 37-60. Borling, J. (2011). Music Therapy and Addiction: Addressing Essential Components of the Recovery Process. In A. Meadows (Ed.), Developments in Music Therapy Practice: Case Study Perspectives (pp. 234-249). Gilsum, NH: Barcelona.