Frederick Weston, New York Artist Known for Incisive Collages, Has Died at 74

Frederick Weston, the New York artist, performer, and fashion designer whose elaborate collages interrogated the media’s representation of New York’s Black and queer communities, died last week at age 74 from cancer. The news was confirmed by arts nonprofit Visual AIDS, of which Weston had been an active member of the group after his HIV-positive diagnosis.

Weston was a dedicated archivist of mass media representations of men, amassing binders of magazine advertisements, paper ephemera, and fabric which he stored in his longtime Chelsea apartment and studio. (“Hoarding is about ownership and attachment. They really train us to be consumers,” he once said.) In addition to magazine clippings, his intricate and eye-catching collages were culled from photography prints, fabric swatches, food packaging—anything that could be duplicated with a Xerox machine.

“My whole practice really is about the way that men look, men comport themselves and the way that men pose,” Read the rest

Frederick Weston, the New York artist, performer, and fashion designer whose elaborate collages interrogated the media’s representation of New York’s Black and queer communities, died last week at age 74 from cancer. The news was confirmed by arts nonprofit Visual AIDS, of which Weston had been an active member of the group after his HIV-positive diagnosis.

Weston was a dedicated archivist of mass media representations of men, amassing binders of magazine advertisements, paper ephemera, and fabric which he stored in his longtime Chelsea apartment and studio. (“Hoarding is about ownership and attachment. They really train us to be consumers,” he once said.) In addition to magazine clippings, his intricate and eye-catching collages were culled from photography prints, fabric swatches, food packaging—anything that could be duplicated with a Xerox machine.

“My whole practice really is about the way that men look, men comport themselves and the way that men pose,” Read the rest

#EndSARS: Davido & Timi Dakolo Lead Top 5 Songs Played at Protest

Nigerian superstar artists, Davido and Timi Dakolo lead top 5 songs played at the #EndSARS nationwide protest in Nigeria.

Davido and Timi Dakolo

The outcry of Nigerian youths against Police Brutality and demands for Police reform has inspired protest from Nigerian youths within and outside the country.

From social media hashtags to carrying plaques, chanting, and marching the streets of Nigeria, an awakening has begun. ‘Our Mumu don do’ is an expression for enough is enough. The resilient and persistent demands by Nigerian youths for a safe Nigeria for all, have produced a huge turnout of people at different spots.

One powerful tool for expression during the protest has been music and as Ed Sheeran will describe:

Music is a powerful tool in galvanizing people around an issue. There’s no better way to get your point across than to put it in a beautiful song.

All kinds of … Read the rest

Artists Explore Self-Expression Through Bizarre and Whimsical Masks at Denver’s Vicki Myhren Gallery

Felicia Murray, “Our Dying Reefs,” felted COVID mask, 2020. All photos shared with permission.

There is perhaps no symbol more representative of contemporary life than the humble face mask. A simple health device crucial to saving millions of lives around the world from a deadly COVID-19 pandemic spread by invisible airborne pathogens, and yet an object that’s been quixotically politicized at the callous expense of humanity for the gain of an elite few. A new exhibition at the University of Denver’s Vicki Myhren Gallery approaches the lighter side of face coverings: the ancient tradition of masks as self-expression.

Arranged on mannequins lining the gallery space, over 40 artists present interpretations of protective face wear in MASK, currently on view by appointment through December 1, 2020. The collection of whimsical, grotesque, quirky, and beautiful masks are medically non-functional but guaranteed to provoke a reaction through their novel construction. Several designs … Read the rest

The Most Controversial U.S. Museum Deaccessions: Why Do Institutions Sell Art?

Amid economic fallout resulting from the pandemic, many institutions are selling works from their holdings in order to raise capital for the care of their collection. The practice, known as deaccessioning, has been undertaken in recent weeks by the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse, New York, Newfields in Indianapolis, and, most notably, the Baltimore Museum of Art, whose controversial plan to sell $65 million in art have become the subject of national news.

There are no official laws guiding deaccessions in the United States, but most museum officials adhere to guidelines set in place by industry groups like the Association of Art Museum Directors, which has recently relaxed its rules in order to alleviate the economic strain of the pandemic on institutions. Yet even though the AAMD’s leadership has made it clear that deaccessioning could be necessary under certain circumstances, some … Read the rest

Abstract And Modern Art

Impressionism was called “The New Painting” and just what did the nineteenth-century artistic world mean by that? Nebraska Art Today: A Centennial Invitational Exhibition. Omaha, NE: Joslyn Art Museum, 1967. Rykov, M. (2001). Facing the music: Speculations on the dark side of our moon. Journal of Palliative Care, 17(3), 188-192. The Anarchy of Silence – John Cage and Experimental Art. Exh. cat. Barcelona: Museu d’art contemporani de Barcelona, 2009. After graduating, Donald pursued a life-long interest in the theatre. Starting with community and educational theatre around central Scotland, he then moved to Cardiff to take up Postgraduate studies in theatre design and production at University College Cardiff, returning to Scotland in 1989. Donald started to pursue a freelance career in theatre design and scenic art with many Scottish theatre companies, including: The Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, The Citizens Theatre and the Tron Theatre, Glasgow and Scottish Opera and Scottish Ballet as … Read the rest

#EndSARS: Banky W talks about a Nationwide Zoom Conference

Nigerian singer and politician, Bankole Wellington popularly referred to as Banky W has revealed his ideas to organize a nationwide zoom conference to keep the EndSARS conversations going and give survivors a platform to be open about their experience at the Lekki Tollgate Massacre.

Banky W as he is professionally referred to, expressed openly his idea for a nationwide zoom conference on his Twitter page on the 23rd of October 2020. He hopes the conference can propel best ways forward and also be a platform for victims to share their stories as well as protesters discussimg their protest experiences. Banky tweeted:

What do we think about having a nationwide zoom conference? We can share victims stories, talk about our protest experiences, and exchange ideas about the way forward. We can’t lose hope. It’s a marathon not a sprint. Police reform is just step one, the journey has just begun.

Read the rest

German Artist Collective Claims to Have Stolen Joseph Beuys Sculpture

The artist collective Frankfurter Hauptschule claims to have stolen one of Joseph Beuys’s 1985 Capri Battery works from an exhibition in Oberhausen, Germany. According to a report by the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung, the group says that they have given the artwork to a museum in Tanzania as part of a “symbolic act of restitution to the former German colony.”

In a video posted to YouTube, Frankfurter Hauptschule appears to document the heist, which the group claims took place on October 18. That video also includes footage of them transporting the work to Tanzania’s Iringa Boma museum. The group has titled their campaign “Bad Beuys go Africa,” and a description accompanying the video states that the Beuys work is now on permanent display at that institution.

“The museum, which is located in a former military hospital of the German colonial rulers, now displays the ‘Capri-Battery’ alongside traditional objects … Read the rest

History, Characteristics, Movements

Andy Warhol was a famous and well-respected American ‘Pop’ artist, considered even as a ‘Post Renaissance Man’ for his unique and unmatched style. I wondered: Could our processing of music be so different, or so basic, that abilities relating to it remained accessible in people so limited in function? In 1978, little was known about music and brain function. Today, as a result of exponentially increasing research, particularly over the past five years, we can venture some initial answers to my question. Music has been shown to trigger the nucleus accumbens in the brain, and that structure is also associated with dopamine, the chemical the brain releases during eating and sex, so experts believe that music is biologically desired and rewarded. There was another study that used an fMRI machine to examine the activity of the nucleus accumbens while people listened to music. Researchers played 60 clips of novel songs … Read the rest

#EndSARS: DJ Switch Gives First Official Statement Since Lekki Tollgate Massacre & It’s Worse Than We Saw!

Nigerian Disc Jockey and one of the heroes of the Lekki Tollgate Massacre that took the lives of many,  DJ Switch has finally dropped her first official statement since the Lekki Tollgate massacre which happened on the 20th of October and according to her, the incident was more than what she streamed, it was more than what she witnessed.

DJ Switch

Still shaken, the DJ and singer stated on the 23rd of October that she had to come give her statement because of some reports she was seeing online that were obviously not true, cautioning the government to not trivialize the pain of Nigerians who did not just go thr0ugh death that night, but also died at the hands of the people whose sole job is to protect them.

She said;

my life was being threatened for speaking up… I don’t wanna talk too much, I just want to clear

Read the rest

Patty Chang’s Affecting Videos and Photographs Find Emotion in Breast Milk, Death, and More

In March, at the start of what would become a global lockdown, Los Angeles–based artist Patty Chang emailed a Google survey to residents in the city, soliciting lists of their personal fears.

“Personal, global, societal, mundane, or profound,” the survey read. “Everything is valid. Just write down quickly any thoughts that come to your head.” The dozens of responses that Chang received went into the latest iteration of Milk Debt, an ongoing video project based on collective fear—and by extension, fear’s frequent companions of dread, despair, and uncertainty.

In May, with a scheduled solo exhibition postponed by the pandemic, Chang and the 18th Street Arts Center in Santa Monica, California, streamed a preview of the new piece online. The 10-minute clip featured a Zoom call with an unidentified blonde performer who, opening her palm-leaf printed robe, attaches a mechanical milk pump to each of her bare breasts.

As the … Read the rest