PAINTING A WALL MURAL The Ink Bucket

Jean Arp, also known as Hans Arp, was a German-French painter, sculptor, and poet. Khalfa, S., Delbe, C., Bigand, E., Reynaud, E., Chauvel, P., & Liegeois-Chauvel, C. (2008). Positive and negative music recognition reveals a specialization of mesio-temporal structures in epileptic patients. Music Perception, 25(4), 295-302. Gohr, Siegfried. Bilderstreit: Widerspruch, Einheit und Fragment in der Kunst … Continue reading “PAINTING A WALL MURAL The Ink Bucket”

Jean Arp, also known as Hans Arp, was a German-French painter, sculptor, and poet. Khalfa, S., Delbe, C., Bigand, E., Reynaud, E., Chauvel, P., & Liegeois-Chauvel, C. (2008). Positive and negative music recognition reveals a specialization of mesio-temporal structures in epileptic patients. Music Perception, 25(4), 295-302. Gohr, Siegfried. Bilderstreit: Widerspruch, Einheit und Fragment in der Kunst Seit 1960. Exh. cat. Köln: Museum Ludwig, 1989. Sidney Janis Gallery, New York. Gorky Alternate Title: 33 Paintings by Arshile Gorky. 2 – 28 December 1957. Catalogue. Lin Yuanpin (2014) “Revealing spatio-spectral electroencephalographic dynamics of musical mode and tempo perception by independent component analysis.” Journal of neuroengineering and rehabilitation 11: 18. Mandel, S., Hanser, S., Secic, M., & Davis, B. (2007). Effects of music therapy on health-related outcomes in cardiac rehabilitation: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Music Therapy, 44(3), 176-197. Dickinson, S.C., Odell-Miller, H., & Adlam, J. (Eds.). (2013). Forensic Music Therapy: A Treatment for Men and Women in Secure Hospital Settings. London: Jessica Kingsley. Wylie, Charles. Single Panel Paintings from the 1980s.” Ellsworth Kelly in Dallas. Exh. cat. Dallas: Dallas Museum of Art, 2004: 36. Paper comes in many different shapes, textures, weights colours and sizes. Research in the area of Music, Brain, & Cognition aims to shed light on some of the key issues in current and future music research and technology. Cognitive musicology was envisaged by Seifert et al. 16 and Leman et al. 17 to be composed from diverse disciplines such as brain research and artificial intelligence striving for a more scientific understanding of the phenomenon of music. In recent years, computational neuroscience has attracted great aspirations, exemplified by the silicon retina 18 and the ambitious Blue Brain Project that aims at revolutionising computers by replacing their microcircuits by models of neocortical columns 19 Research activity in auditory neuroscience, applied to music in particular, is catching up with the scientific advances in vision research. Shamma et al. 20 proposed that the same neural processing takes place for the visual as well as for the auditory domain. Other researchers suggested biologically inspired models specific to the auditory domain; e.g., Smith and Lewicki 21 decomposed musical signals into gammatone functions that resemble the impulse response of the basilar membrane measured in cats. While everyone has experienced the emotional side of music, not everyone knows that it generates positive physical effects, too. The science of the physical responses to music therapy is a relatively new endeavor and there is still a lot to learn about how the body reacts to it. Recently, studies have shown music therapy aids in helping the body recover quicker and reduces the pain a patient feels through releasing chemicals in the body. This ability to heal faster and reduce pain is especially important for children and infants who may not be able to handle pain medication or communicate clearly where they are feeling discomfort.

A music therapist’s decision making regarding the music used or created in a music therapy session is an idiosyncratic sort of professional decision making, which is distinguished from the decision making of other health-related or music professionals. Decision making has been a burning research topic in many other fields such as politics, industry, medicine, education, and so on; however, research on it has rarely appeared in music therapy despite the importance of clinical decision making in practice. With a focus on clinical music listening, the presenter has developed an analytical model that encapsulates what music therapists listen to in practice and explains how they make judgments or decisions about what they listened to. In order to inquire into a music therapist’s decision making regarding the music used or created in a music therapy session is an idiosyncratic sort of professional decision making, which is distinguished from the decision making of other health-related or music professionals. Decision making has been a burning research topic in many other fields such as politics, industry, medicine, education, and so on; however, research on it has rarely appeared in music therapy despite the importance of clinical decision making in practice. With a focus on clinical music listening, the presenter has developed an analytical model that encapsulates what music therapists listen to in practice and explains how they make judgments or decisions about what they listened to. In order to inquire into music therapists’ perception about their musical decision making and to examine their decision-making strategies, she conducted two studies using the process tracing methods of verbal protocol and the information display board. Her multiple case study using verbal protocol, namely Think Aloud Protocol, investigated the musical decision-making process of seasoned music therapists who have different music therapy backgrounds (e.g., receptive, improvisational, and cognitive behavioral). Right after their music therapy sessions or while watching their videotaped sessions, she interviewed the therapists with the question of why they made such decisions in the situations. The other decision-making research employed a computerized version of the information display board. By choosing from a pre-fabricated list of words, music therapists identified the possible contributors to their musical decision making in clinical situations and listed them in a sequence according to their relative importance. In this way, the music therapists demonstrated their decision-making strategies for the research.

Fenech, A. (2010). Inspiring transformations through participation in drama for individuals with neuropalliative conditions. Journal of Applied Arts and Health, 1(1), 63-80. Our bodies respond to music in conscious and unconscious ways (Clark, Baker, & Taylor, 2016). While we may take the influence of music for granted, there are complex interactions occurring in our brains and bodies that impact our physical movement, thoughts, and feelings (Altenmüller & Schlaug, 2012; Koelsch, Fritz, Cramon, Müller, & Friederici, 2006). When we listen to music, our bodies respond automatically (Burger, Thompson, Luck, Saarikallio, & Toiviainen, 2013). We breathe in time, move in time, and our hearts may even beat in time (Levitin & Tirovolas, 2009; Zatorre, Chen, & Penhune, 2007). Dancers illustrate this phenomenon beyond timing or rhythm as they capture musical meaning from the full spectrum of music including melody and harmony with their bodies (Quiroga Murcia & Kreutz, 2012). The Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, presents a fabulous exhibition entitled In Fine Style: The Art of Tudor and Stuart Fashion. This fascinating display reveals how 16th and 17th artists depicted the fashion trends of the day. Music is a powerful tool and can help individuals regulate emotions, overcome difficult situations, and find joy in their everyday life. By understanding how E-S theory explains individual differences in musical experiences, researchers can better understand how music can increase empathy and reflective functioning in both the general population and in individuals with ASC. Importantly, this line of research can extend to the study of group processes. There has been some evidence to show that music can decrease stereotypes towards out-groups (Sousa, Neto, & Mullet 2005), and increase in-group favoritism (Bakagiannis & Tarrant, 2006; Londsdale & North, 2009) and prosocial behavior (Greitemeyer, 2009). Anecdotally, orchestras such as Daniel Barenboim’s West Eastern Divan Orchestra (Cheah, 2009) have shown that people can use music to overcome cultural boundaries, and increased empathy may be a facilitating factor in these social psychological processes. Gaining a firm grasp on the specifics of these music-related processes will not only help inform music therapists and clinicians about how music can be used in individual and group therapeutic treatments, but it can also inform lay individuals about how to use music as a guide or “pocket therapist” that is only one click away on the iPod or mobile phone. Improves memory. Research has shown that the repetitive elements of rhythm and melody help our brains form patterns that enhance memory. In a study of stroke survivors, listening to music helped them experience more verbal memory, less confusion, and better focused attention.

Rose, Kerry. Ellsworth Kelly.” Modernism from the National Gallery of Art – The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection. Exh. cat. Washington: National Gallery of Art, 2014: 84-85. Hess, Thomas B. New York: The State of Art. Exh. cat. Albany: New York State Museum, 1977. A group show, Imagined Futures Reconstructed Pasts, on till Sunday at Bikaner House in New Delhi, features two photo works by Prajakta Potnis which were part of her exhibition When The Wind Blows, held in January by Project 88. They show staged scenarios within an old freezer—against the ice building up are everyday objects, pressure-cooker whistles in one, a lighter in another. In the photographs, the magnified scale allows a separate narrative to unfold in the viewer’s mind—an apocalyptic landscape, of something on the verge of being blown up”. When The Wind Blows was an extension of Potnis’ interest in showing the connection between the private—through the use of quotidian objects—and the political. The title of the show itself was derived from a graphic novel from the 1960s, which deals with the fear of the atom bomb. The fear is still there, and it’s even scarier with (US president-elect) Donald Trump,” says Potnis. The series was inspired by The Kitchen Debate”, a hilarious, heated debate between (Ronald) Reagan and (Nikita) Khrushchev in front of a washing machine, at a time when the US was trying to show off their modern kitchen appliances to the Communist world. It was like watching two little boys fighting, each propagating their own ideology,” says Potnis. Capitalism, the impact of war, environmental degradation, genetically modified food, loss of privacy, the works of Potnis, who did her master’s from the Sir JJ School of Art in Mumbai, are inherently derived from contemporary anxieties. So, if a still-life painting of a cauliflower takes on the form of a mushroom cloud, in site-specific works she developed the idea of the wall as a membrane between the inside and outside space”. From hanging threads giving the perception of cracks to keyholes drilled in walls or frills hung as skirting to give the impression of a curtain—opaque spaces appear fragile, giving the sense of being watched”. Watson, T. (Ed.). (2007). Music Therapy with Adults with Learning Disabilities. Hove: Routledge. By the end of the 3 day intensive course, Monsieur Chauveau had worked on all of us and some more than once. All different body paintings but all equally stunning. Donohoe, Victoria. An Abstract Artist Builds a Following” (Matthews Hamilton exhibition review). The Philadelphia Inquirer, 11 December 1984: H19, illustrated.