The Artist Looks At Nature

Georgia ‘Keeffe or Georgia Totto ‘Keeffe was an American painter, who revolutionized the concept of modern abstract art. Krout, R.E. (2015). Music Therapy Community-Based Clinical Learning Experiences Here and Abroad: A Focus on Community Engagement. In K. D. Goodman (Ed.), International Perspectives in Music Therapy Education and Training: Adapting to a Changing World (pp. 103-129). Springfield, Illinois: … Continue reading “The Artist Looks At Nature”

Georgia ‘Keeffe or Georgia Totto ‘Keeffe was an American painter, who revolutionized the concept of modern abstract art. Krout, R.E. (2015). Music Therapy Community-Based Clinical Learning Experiences Here and Abroad: A Focus on Community Engagement. In K. D. Goodman (Ed.), International Perspectives in Music Therapy Education and Training: Adapting to a Changing World (pp. 103-129). Springfield, Illinois: Charles C Thomas Publisher. The disorder has further been categorized into two types – congenital and acquired amusia. ‘Congenital’ amusia, also known as tone-deafness, is a musical disorder that is inherited whereas ‘acquired’ amusia occurs as a consequence of brain damage. People suffering from congenital amusia lack basic musical abilities that include melodic discrimination and recognition. This disorder cannot be explained by prior brain lesion, hearing loss, cognitive deficits, socio-affective disturbance, or lack of environmental stimulation. Individuals suffering from congenital amusia often only have impaired musical abilities but are able to process speech, common environmental sounds and human voices similar to typical individuals. This suggested that music is ‘biological’ i.e., it is innately present in humans. Studies have shown that congenital amusia is a deficit in fine-grained pitch discrimination and that 4{665e5bb4999eb4b63bc5cf86855959e213eef9597fcb7384ae9a16de7fc2db97} of the population suffers from this disorder. Amusic brains have been found in fMRI studies to have less white matter and thicker cortex than controls in the right inferior frontal cortex. These differences suggest abnormal neuronal development in inferior frontal gyrus and its connection to auditory cortex, the two areas which are important in musical-pitch processing. Although there are no cures for congenital amusia, some treatments have been found to be effective in improving the musical abilities of those suffering from congenital amusia. In one such study, singing intervention was shown to improve the perception of music in amusic individuals, and it is hoped that more methods will be discovered that may help people overcome congenital amusia. Breton described Dalí’s art as a retrograde craft with the most extreme inventions of modern culture,” highlighting Dalí’s emblematic artistic style that provoked his viewers to explore literature, religious concepts, and more. Yves Ullens opens an exhibition of new works from his project Urban Traces at MM Gallery in Brussels, Belgium. This body of work continues the artist’s exploration of abstraction in the urban environment. Photos taken over a period of more than 10 years in megacities around the world come together for the first time. Wyatt, J.G. (2002). From the field: Clinical resources for music therapy with juvenile offenders. Music Therapy Perspectives, 20(2), 80-88.

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Art: Sculpture, Paintings, Watercolors, and Drawings. 23 November 1943 – 4 January 1944. Catalogue. While these paintings were admired and collected, they were mostly displayed in ethnographic museums that showed the art of the Indigenous First People. Thomas Nozkowski (exhibition brochure). Interview by Jonathan Lasker. Paris: Galerie Frank, 2000: illustrated. Viola is not the only contemporary artist in recent years who has contributed to the time-honoured tradition of religious art without resorting to satire or mockery. The British artist Mark Wallinger, for example, has made several artworks that draw upon the machinery of religion and explore questions of faith. These include Ecce Homo (1999), a life-size, white-resin cast of a young man representing Christ that was placed temporarily on top of the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square. Freeman, Marina. Celebrating Lithography at 200.” Graphic Abstraction in America – A View from the First Century. Exh. cat. University Art Museum, California State University, Long Beach, 1998: 8-10. Coplans, John. The Earlier Work of Ellsworth Kelly.” Artforum vol. 7, no. 10 (Summer, 1969): 48-55. Lagman, R., Gallagher, L., Davis, M., Legrand, S., & Walsh, D. (2006). The integration of music therapy services at a palliative medicine centre. Journal of Palliative Care, 22(3), 239. 6. Repetition. When you see the same lines, colors, or themes etc. over and over again in either a single painting, or a collection of paintings. You could say, I really think the repetition of the snake bite in all these paintings is over-done.” Though people might argue that statement, everyone would respect you for it. against which they have been placed (see Positive-Negative Space). Finger Weave: A weave created through the direct intervention of the weaver by manipulation of individual warp yarns with the fingers or a pickup stick. Focal Point: The centre of interest or attention in a work of art. Foreground: In 2-D works, the space depicted as being nearest to the viewer. Foreshortening: The apparent visual compression or distortion of forms in a composition to indicate depth in space (e.g., apparent distortion of a figure by enlarging extremities closest to the observer.) Form: A shape in three dimensions; mass. Formal Balance: An orderly organization of components in a composition that usually incorporates axial symmetry of forms. Fresco: A process of painting on wet plaster, in which pigments are mixed with water and chemically bonded to the plater; the process was perfected during the Italian Renaissance. Frottage: An image created by rubbing a soft drawing instrument on the surface on paper which covers a textured surface.